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For Amira Elghawaby, it was the carpet. Ms. Elghawaby lives in Ottawa. But when she watched video of Friday’s Christchurch mosque massacre, she was struck by the green prayer carpet on which the victims lay. It was just like the carpets at so quite a few of the mosques exactly where she has prayed.

The New Zealand attack, which left 50 worshipers dead, has shaken Muslim communities across the globe. It has also steeled them against the possibility of extra such atrocities. As anti-Muslim sentiment rises, a related assault could come about anyplace, worries Raja Iqbal, CEO of an artificial intelligence get started-up, leaving his mosque in Redmond, Washington, final Friday. “There’s a expanding nationalism about the globe, a expanding xenophobia,” he says.

And it is that mood, felt globally, that set the scene for the savagery in Christchurch, some observers say. Hostile rhetoric is becoming extra commonplace, and so as well are hate crimes against Muslims. Specially worrying, says Fiyaz Mughal, a monitor of anti-Muslim activity in Britain, “most incidents applied to be on the net now they are predominantly street events. Issues are flipping into the actual globe really substantively.”

Paris Toronto and Redmond, Wash.

For Amira Elghawaby, it was the carpet.

Ms. Elghawaby lives in Ottawa. But when she watched video of Friday’s Christchurch mosque massacre, she was struck by the green prayer carpet on which the victims lay, which was just like the carpets at so quite a few of the mosques exactly where she has prayed.

“It just felt so close,” she says.

The New Zealand attack, which left 50 worshipers dead, has shaken Muslim communities across the globe. It has also steeled them against the possibility of extra such atrocities.

As anti-Muslim sentiment rises, a related assault could come about anyplace, worries Raja Iqbal, CEO of an artificial intelligence get started-up, leaving his mosque in Redmond, Washington, final Friday. “I do not assume it is purely Islamophobia,” he says. “There’s a expanding nationalism about the globe, a expanding xenophobia.”

And it is that mood, felt in the United States and Canada as properly as in Europe and additional afield, that set the scene for the savagery of final Friday’s events in Christchurch, some observers say. Hostile rhetoric – voiced and fed by politicians, the media, and social networks – is becoming extra commonplace, and so as well are hate crimes against Muslims.

“The ground for violent actions is laid by violent discourse,” says Rachid Benzine, a noted French-Moroccan scholar of Islam. “Words can kill.”

Specially worrying, says Fiyaz Mughal, an award-winning monitor of anti-Muslim activity in Britain, “most incidents applied to be on the net now they are predominantly street events. Issues are flipping into the actual globe really substantively.”

‘Always in the back of my mind’

The instant priority at the Redmond mosque on Friday was physical safety. Police stepped up their presence, and “we are thinking about any and all safety measures,” says Amelia Neighbors, a member of the mosque’s board.

Worshipers also appeared to appreciate indicators of help from a little group of properly-wishers from other faiths who gathered in front of the mosque. But they are conscious of a hardening mood in the United States.

Hate crimes have been increasing year following year, according to FBI figures, and attacks on Muslims and their areas of prayer hit an all-time higher in 2016 ahead of falling back slightly in 2017, the final year for which statistics are out there.

North of the border, Canada has stood out for its embrace of multiculturalism and the welcome it has provided to Syrian refugees, however a related trend has emerged. Hate crimes jumped by 47 % in 2017 from the year ahead of, according to government figures, and crimes targeting Muslims rose by 151 %. Incidents against Muslims in Quebec peaked in March 2017, the month following a gunman killed six worshipers at the Islamic Cultural Center in Quebec City.

Ms. Elghawaby, whose Egyptian parents brought her to Canada when she was a infant, says she is not frightened (although somebody when drove a pickup truck straight at her ahead of swerving away as passengers yelled at her to take her headscarf off). “But it is usually in the back of my thoughts.”

At Toronto’s Jami mosque, the oldest in the city, administrator Amjed Syed says he will not be cowed by the Christchurch attack. “We are not paranoid,” he says. “Our doors are open all the time.”

Sara Miller Llana/The Christian Science Monitor

Hamdy Shafiq, imam of the Jami Mosque in Toronto, says that his congregation will not be intimidated by the mosque attacks in New Zealand.

Continental attitudes

In the heavily Muslim suburb of Pantin, north of Paris, mosque president M’hammed Henniche is extra circumspect. Even though he turned down a government provide of an armed police guard, he is maintaining his doors locked in between prayers for safety’s sake.

Violent attacks on mosques are uncommon in France, but the atmosphere normally feels hostile to Muslims, Mr. Henniche says. “We are extra visible today, significantly less ashamed of our religion than our parents have been, and that tends to make a lot of ordinary French folks afraid that their nation is getting taken more than,” he explains.

“In basic society there is a worry of Islam,” adds Mr. Benzine. “Sometimes it appears like mass hysteria,” he says, pointing to the media and political firestorm that erupted lately when a sportswear chain introduced a moisture-wicking Islamic headscarf for joggers. The retailer was forced to withdraw the item in the face of charges it was contributing to the isolation of Muslim females.

Prevalent attitudes in France toward Muslims are also manifest in hiring practices. A study final year located that a religious Muslim man had 4 instances fewer possibilities of getting known as to a job interview than a religious Christian with precisely the identical CV.

Such discrimination “frustrates Muslims and tends to make them turn inward toward their personal neighborhood,” says Mr. Henniche. “And that spurs extra French racism against them.”

Politicians can make issues worse. Then-Interior Minister Gérard Collomb stated final year he located it “shocking” that the head of a student union at the Sorbonne University – a Muslim convert – ought to put on a headscarf. He stated it was “a sign … she is distinct from French society.”

Nor do Muslims really feel incredibly welcome in courtrooms in Bavaria, in southern Germany. The state’s constitutional court final week upheld a ban on judges and prosecutors wearing headscarves on the grounds that they ought to be neutral in matters of religion. A Christian cross, meanwhile, hangs in every single Bavarian courtroom.

German Interior Minister Horst Seehofer, a senior member of the ruling Christian Social Union celebration, sparked controversy final year when he declared that “Islam is not aspect of Germany.”

“When politicians say all day extended that Muslims are distinct, that they do not belong, is it surprising when you see an boost in Islamophobic violence?” wonders Nadim Houry, head of the terrorism plan at Human Rights Watch. “It certainly creates an enabling atmosphere.”

The initially nine months of 2017 saw 97 attacks on mosques in Germany, a 25 % jump from the identical period a year earlier, according to the Turkish Islamic Union for Religious Affairs, which runs most of the mosques in the nation.

‘The best storm’

In Britain, the quantity of anti-Muslim incidents continues to rise, hitting new records in 2017 according to TellMAMA, an organization that measures anti-Muslim attacks. There has been a current surge in the quantity of reported incidents and in their level of aggression, says Mr. Mughal, TellMAMA’s founder.

Mr. Mughal blames social media businesses, specially Twitter, for getting slow to take down posts by appropriate-wing extremists and to block the accounts on which they seem. He also points a finger at inflammatory newspaper headlines.

Ann Scott Tyson/The Christian Science Monitor

Worshipers leave Friday prayers at a big mosque in Redmond, Washington, as a police officer appears on. More officers secured the mosque on March 15.

A 2012 study of the U.K. press more than 3 months by scholars at Leeds University located that 70 % of stories about Muslims have been hostile and that 80 % of them incorporated no Muslim sources. “Press coverage representing Muslims is largely hostile and … Muslim voices stay marginal,” the researchers located.

Other things behind the rise in violent Islamophobia, Mr. Mughal suggests, contain Islamist terror attacks, the financial downturn and the monetary strains it has imposed, routine discrimination against Muslims, and the far right’s efficient use of the web.

“A mixture of all these components has designed the best storm,” Mr. Mughal says. “It creates an atmosphere exactly where hate is normalized, an atmosphere of dehumanization with out any sense of empathy or care” in which outrages such as the Christchurch massacre turn into probable.

“Sadly, I assume it is only a matter of time ahead of there is an additional a single like that,” Mr. Mughal says.

The view from the Middle East

What influence is all this obtaining on the overwhelmingly Muslim Middle East, exactly where millions of households have relatives living in Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand?

Western foreign policies and the wars they have fostered imply that the United States and Europe are extensively unpopular in the Middle East. But the Christchurch massacre has brought to the surface uglier allegations.

“The U.S. bans Muslims. Muslims are killed in the mosque as simply as they are killed in wars right here,” says Abu Mohammed, a young Jordanian engineer. “They do not just want our financial sources or our lands they really hate Islam and Muslims.”

The attack has also stirred fears about living in the West. “It is not protected getting an Arab or a Muslim in the West,” stated Awra Ali, a Jordanian nurse whose sister lives in Michigan. “No matter if they speak about human rights or inclusivity, you will usually be distinct you will usually be the other you will usually be a target.”

Some would-be emigrants even say they are rethinking their plans to escape the region’s deadening unemployment prices. “I have been dreaming of the West, considering of it as heaven on Earth, the answer to all my issues,” says Mohammed Tamimi, an Amman taxi driver who has been applying for scholarships in Australia and Canada.

Chris Young/The Canadian Press/AP

People today collect for a vigil for the victims of the New Zealand terror attack on March 15 in Toronto.

“But it appears like the Arab globe is a great deal superior for me. At least right here I can pray with out worry.”

But incredibly couple of folks blame any specific religion for the inflammatory rhetoric and Islamophobic attacks in Western nations that they hear about.

“We can not let a single isolated incident by a single sick individual colour our perception of an whole folks, nation, or religion,” insisted Ahmed Awreikat, a cousin of a single of the males who died in Christchurch, at the victim’s funeral. “In the West, they have democratic institutions, transparency, and inalienable rights,” he pointed out. “That ought to be adequate to safeguard Arabs and Muslims.”

Across the globe in Ottawa, Amira Elghawaby is also placing her trust in such “Western values” and hoping that the authorities will uphold them.

“I know that Canadians are by and big exceptionally welcoming and supportive, and … I do really feel that I belong right here,” she says. “But at the identical time I’m actually searching to all levels of government, absolutely everyone, to actually do extra to attempt to root out this sort of hatred.”

Taylor Luck in Amman, Jordan, and Clifford Coonan in Berlin contributed reporting to this post.

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