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Matt Nagy’s choice to sit on the ball late Sunday, alternatively of attempting to line up for a additional manageable field purpose, was additional confirmation of what we currently know: he requires a new quarterback. Even though Twitter professionals go back-and-forth on who is to blame, the very simple truth is that Nagy does not trust Mitch Trubisky. As extended as that is the case, the Bears can not win.

It wasn’t normally the case.

In a comparable circumstance in the playoff loss final year, the head coach let Trubisky throw deep. Had Trubisky thrown accurately there would have been no such point as “the double doink”. Somewhere along the way (Week One particular, maybe?) Trubisky lost his coach’s faith. And he is not carrying out something to get it back. Week-by-week, the quarterback misses reads, misses throws and loses.

At this point, arguing for Trubisky is admitting bias. Even when the quarterback does very good items, he also tends to make massive errors and Sunday was a classic instance. It could’ve been 1 of the ideal games of the young quarterback’s profession. He created throws down the field. He thread the needle in a tight spot. For the initial time all season, he created a play with his legs.

But he nevertheless lost the game.

He threw a horrendous, demoralizing interception.

He missed a wide open touchdown.

He then fumbled to set up the game-winning drive.

How could anyone ask Nagy to contact a play in which the quarterback could shed the game when he was hunting at an simple field purpose? When it came down to trusting his young kicker or his young quarterback, Nagy chose the kicker.

Turns out there was no proper selection.

Nagy’s lack of trust in the quarterback can be discovered on each play. He’s reverted to a simplified version of a complex offense, wherein he can not regularly contact plays down the field since he can not trust the quarterback to make the proper study or an correct throw. The offense ends up with a bunch of dig routes since that is the only route the quarterback regularly reads and throws properly.

Who, precisely, Nagy would trust is an intriguing conversation. The simple answer is Nick Foles, a Super Bowl-winning veteran who knows the coach and the offense. There is also the possibility that Alex Smith is in a position to return to the league and play just after a devastating leg injury. But he’ll be 36 and has in no way been an perfect starter, anyway. This is a very good off-season to uncover a veteran quarterback, with Teddy Bridgewater, Marcus Mariota, Jameis Winston and Derek Carr all possibly becoming offered. (And it is viewed as a quarterback-wealthy draft, what ever that implies.)

Nagy pretty much normally talks about the “why part” when it comes to evaluating what has gone incorrect. When it comes to the lack of production with the quarterback, the why portion is apparent. It is time to start off pondering about who will repair it.

Go down the line of vibrant young offensive minds and you will see 1 continual: their offenses suck when they do not have capable quarterbacks. Till Nagy gets a quarterback we will not have any thought how very good he can be.

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